Baltimore Concert Opera Opens Fifth Season With Spirited ‘l’elisir’

inside llewyn davis

(Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Marcus Mumford, Oscar Isaac Musicians Marcus Mumford, left, and Oscar Isaac perform together during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Gillian Welsh, Rhiannon Giddens, Carey Mulligan Singers Gillian Welsh, left, Rhiannon Giddens and actress Carey Mulligan, right, perform together during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Marcus Mumford, Oscar Isaac Musicians Marcus Mumford, left, and Oscar Isaac perform together during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Marcus Mumford, Oscar Isaac Musicians Marcus Mumford, left, and Oscar Isaac perform together during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Marcus Mumford, Oscar Isaac Musicians Marcus Mumford, center, and Oscar Isaac, right, perform with members of the Punch Brothers during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Marcus Mumford, Oscar Isaac Musicians Marcus Mumford, center, and Oscar Isaac, right, perform with members of the Punch Brothers during “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis” at The Town Hall on Sunday, Sept.

Naples Concert Band Kicks Off 42nd Season with Memorial Concert

EDT, September 30, 2013 A lot has happened, operatically, in Baltimore during the past few years. The city lost its proud Baltimore Opera Company after more than five decades, then gained a sort of second cousin in the form of Lyric Opera Baltimore. Opera Vivente folded its tent after more than a dozen years. Baltimore Opera Theatre came and went in what seemed like a flash. Amid these and other changes, Baltimore Concert Opera , founded by former Baltimore Opera singers, has managed to hang on and maintain a steady course. The organization, which just opened its fifth season, presents unstaged operas in the relatively intimate ballroom of the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion (Engineer’s Club), with only piano accompaniment. An opera given in concert form without an orchestra is far more limiting than one without costumes or sets. But, at its best, this company is able to make the pared-down experience quite satisfying when assembling a cast that can make the music come alive. A good example came Sunday afternoon with a performance of Donizetti’s endearing “L’elisir d’amore.” Lately, Baltimore Concert Opera has been getting a useful benefit from founder Brendan Cooke’s dual duties these days. In addition to serving as artistic director of the Baltimore ensemble, he recently became general director of Opera Delaware. Now, singers engaged for one can also perform for the other. Opera Delaware will present a staged version of “L’elisir” next week; cast and conductor, in effect, got the advantage of having a couple extra run-throughs of the piece in Baltimore. The singers had the score in their heads (no music stands for this performance, as has often been the case). And, having been through some of the staging rehearsals for Wilmington, the cast easily tossed in a lot of acting (and inter-acting) here.

Verdi, Puccini, Poulenc for 2013-2014 season at the Lyric

Music director Christoph Eschenbach at the National Symphony Orchestras season opener Sunday night. (Scott Suchman/National Symphony Orchestra) I want to thank the federal government for paying for it, Rubenstein told the audience Sunday night. And I want to thank the painters for finishing before tomorrow night. The timing, he admitted to laughter, was dumb luck. The gala concert was scheduled more than a year ago, so the $1 million repair and paint job (white, silver, and gold, which nicely matched the NSOs gleaming new organ) was completed over the summer long before a government shutdown threatened the national arts complex. Yo-Yo Ma and Cameron Carpenter. (Margot Schulman) The Kennedy Center has an unusual relationship with the feds: The government pays for the building, grounds and upkeep; private donations pay for performances, staff and other programs, explained spokesman John Dow. The shutdown contingency plans allow concerts, shows and educational programs to continue, but tours will be suspended and the building closed until an hour before evening performances. Of the centers 1,200 full and part-time employees, about 50 are directly impacted by the government going out of business. Supreme Court Justice John Roberts chats with Kennedy Center chairman David Rubenstein at the gala. (Margot Schulman) Which gave the annual NSO gala a certain fin de siecle vibe: VIP patrons (including Justices John Roberts, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony Kennedy) in gowns and tuxedos, a post-performance dinner and dancing in a candlelit tent, music lovers clustered around cellist Yo-Yo Ma, organ virtuoso Cameron Carpenter (steampunk classical in a mohawk, feathered Victorian cravat and rhinestone boots), and conductor Christoph Eschenbach. The gala, chaired by former General Dynamics president Jay Johnson and Sydney Johnson, raised $1.3 million for the NSOs educational programs. Oh, and Rubenstein has a proposal for those warring factions on the Hill. As all of you have heard, music can be beautiful, he said. It can soothe people and make them feel better. So wed like to invite all 535 members of Congress to come tomorrow for a concert.

Kennedy Center’s lucky pre-shutdown timing: Makeover for concert hall, NSO black-tie gala

Songs and soloists that Bill introduced during his conducting tenure will be featured. The Paradise Brass Quintet will pay tribute to Bill with Thats A Plenty, and Amazing Grace. Vocalist, Jenny Bintliff, will present A Judy Garland Medley. Tuba soloist, Joe Choomack, will also be featured in Carioca from Rio de Janeiro. Two of Bills favorite arrangements, Pilatus, by Steven Reineke and Stevie Wonders Sir Duke will be performed. Marches, Oktoberfest Polkas, Broadway Show Tunes, and the Rimsky-Korsakov Classic, Scheherazade will round out the program. Special thanks to NCB entertainer sponsor, Sun Reality, Diane J. Brennan, GRI. Guests are encouraged to arrive early with lawn chairs and blankets for seating. Admission is free, with donations appreciated. Donations received at each concert help to defray operating expenses and are applied to The Bands Scholarship Fund, which awards scholarships each year to deserving student members of The Band. For those interested in learning more about the Naples Concert Band, there will be a tent at all performances with information about future concerts, sponsorships, volunteer opportunities, and how to become a Fan of the Band and receive a complimentary NCB tote bag. The Naples Concert Band is a non-profit organization dedicated to entertaining the community with old-fashioned concerts in the park. The Bands 42nd season will expand upon last seasons record breaking performances.