Insight: As Ukraine Looks West To Europe, Russia’s Shadow Looms

Manhattan judge tosses drug charges against former Miss Russia Anna Malova

But Europe cannot afford to compromise on justice and human rights solely to pull one country closer into its orbit, no matter how strategically important it may be. Ukraine has to carry out a range of judicial, electoral and business reforms to secure the association agreement, as well as finding a solution to the case of Yulia Tymoshenko, the former prime minister now imprisoned for abuse of power following a 2011 trial the EU said was based on selective justice. EU officials are satisfied with the progress made on reforms, and expect all of the ‘benchmarks’ to have been met by the Vilnius summit on November 28-29. But Tymoshenko is a much more intractable problem with no clear solution. Germany has said it wants the former prime minister, who is receiving treatment for back problems while under guard in hospital, released or at least allowed to travel abroad for treatment before it can back the association agreement. That position is broadly supported by Britain, France, the Netherlands and the Nordic countries, while several east European member states are more flexible on what the terms of any deal on Tymoshenko should be. For Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich it is a deeply emotive issue. There is an ingrained animosity between him and his former political rival and a fear, analysts say, of retaliation by her against him if she is set free. What’s more, Ukraine says it is not possible to release Tymoshenko unconditionally as it would violate the law, an argument officials in Brussels acknowledge has some truth. The hope was an agreement could be reached by October 21, when EU foreign ministers hold a regular monthly meeting. But EU officials are not convinced the date will hold. They are also not sure a deal can be clinched by the meeting after that on November 18 – just 10 days before the eastern partnership summit.

Scope Independent market sizing of Russian HNWIs across five wealth bands HNWI volume, wealth and allocation trends from 2007 to 2011 HNWI volume, wealth and allocation forecasts to 2016 HNWI and UHNWI asset allocations across 13 asset classes Number of UHNWIs in each city City wise breakdowns of UHNWI volumes and volume growth from 2007 to 2011, as well as 2016 forecasts Number of wealth managers in each city City wise ratings of wealth management saturation and potential Details of the development, challenges and opportunities of the Wealth Management and Private Banking sector in Russia Size of the local wealth management industry Largest private banks in Russia by AuM Detailed wealth management and family office information Insights into the drivers of HNWI wealth Reasons To Buy The WealthInsight Intelligence Center Database is an unparalleled resource and the leading resource of its kind. Compiled and curated by a team of expert research specialists, the Database comprises up to one hundred data-points on over 100,000 HNWIs from around the world. It also includes profiles on major private banks, wealth managers and family offices in each country. With the Database as the foundation for our research and analysis, we are able obtain an unsurpassed level of granularity, insight and authority on the HNWI and wealth management universe in each of the countries and regions we cover. Comprehensive forecasts to 2016. Detailed information on UHNWIs in each major city. Key Highlights As of 2011, there are just over 159,500 HNWIs in Russia, with a combined wealth of US$941 billion. The total number of HNWIs in Russia decreased by 18.1% during the review period (20072011), while HNWI wealth declined by 25%. WealthInsight research shows that over 35% of Russian HNWI wealth was held offshore at the end of 2011. The current wealth management leaders in Russia are UBS and Credit Suisse with local AuM of US$15 billion and US$10 billion respectively. Other prominent foreign players include Pictet and Goldman Sachs. The leading locally based private banks are UFG Invest, Troika Dialog and Third Rome.

Russia – The Future of HNWIs to 2016: The Land of Oil and Gas

She was indicted in 2011 on charges she submitted more than 40 stolen prescriptions for pills By Shayna Jacobs / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 10:13 PM Comment Marc A. Hermann for New York Daily News Former Miss Russia Anna Malova leaves Manhattan Criminal Court after updating a judge on her status with a drug treatment program. A Manhattan drug court judge tossed charges against a pill-addicted former Miss Russia on Tuesday. Anna Malova , 42, a former Miss Universe contestant, insisted shes clean and reformed after spending two years in drug treatment. She was indicted in 2011 after allegedly submitting more than 40 stolen prescriptions for Vicodin and Klonopin, and was later rearrested for shoplifting. Ive learned my lesson . . . I look at the world with clear eyes, the sharply dressed blond said after receiving a certificate of achievement from the court. Her attorney, Robert Gottlieb, said she deserves enormous credit for overcoming addiction and mental health issues . . . She has had real ups and downs and has had to fight to accomplish this graduation. Prosecutors fought the decision, arguing her track record in the program was uneven and that she had many relapses. She is also still on Suboxone, an anti-depressant that has been prescribed to her, they pointed out.