Seizures Turned Into Music With Help Of ‘brain Stethoscope’ (audio)

Now at your library: Streaming movies, music

“My initial interest was an artistic one at heart, but, surprisingly, we could instantly differentiate seizure activity from non-seizure states with just our ears,” Chafe, a professor of music research at the university, said in a written statement. “It was like turning a radio dial from a static-filled station to a clear one.” The researchers say their “brain stethoscope” could lead to the development of a biofeedback device that would make it possible for caregivers to detect seizures in people with epilepsy simply by listening to their brain wave activity. “Someone – perhaps a mother caring for a child — who hasn’t received training in interpreting visual EEGs [electroencephalograms] can hear the seizure rhythms and easily appreciate that there is a pathological brain phenomenon taking place,” Parvizi, associate professor of neurology at the university, said in the statement. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow The Brain As Art Wellcome Trust employee Zoe Middleton poses for the media by a work entitled ‘My Soul’ by artist Katherine Dawson, that is a laser etched in lead crystal glass of the artist’s own MRI scan, at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) French Phrenological Model A French Phrenological model, from the mid 19th century, of a head with brain exposed is seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains – The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Pathologies In Brain Specimens A selection of brain specimens preserved in acrylic illustrating different pathologies on loan from the Mutter Museum -The College of Physicians of Philadelphia are seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Surgical Skull Holes A Bronze Age skull from Jericho in the West Bank that shows four holes made by the ancient surgical process of trephination carried out to treat a range of medical conditions, some of which were believed to have been caused by evil spirits, is on display at the exhibition ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Diagrams of the Skull A member of the media takes an image of diagrams of the human skull at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) ‘Brains – Mind as Matter’ A Wellcome Trust employee stands in front of a video that journeys through slices of the brain in a kaleidoscope of colour at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012.

Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas Now, we may be getting too much of Timberlake. The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2 uses the same formula thats becoming his musical trademark the trance-inducing grooves and futuristic electronic beats helmed by Timbaland and Timberlake, who co-wrote each song. Unfortunately it doesnt feel new. Like FutureSex and the first 20/20 album, the songs on 2 of 2 are long, but they arent as entertaining or as cohesive as his first effort. Some tracks sound like leftovers from past recording sessions, and dare we say it actually drag on. The album starts on the wrong note with Gimme What I Dont Know (I Want) and the nine-minute True Blood, both up-tempo songs that lack that Timberlake-esque spark and swag. The lead single, the disco number Take Back the Night, might be good for mere mortal pop stars, but compared to Timberlakes own lofty standards, disappoints. A better choice would have been the Drake-assisted Cabaret, which is smooth and has an addictive hook. Not all of 2 of 2 should be dismissed: You Got It On is soft slow jam listen and youll feel like youre on a cloud. And the midtempo Drink You Away is the discs most adventurous offering.

Smule launches huge Web-based music social network

As of early September, there are about 220,000 people using the app, said Michael Manon, Hoopla’s brand manager. The goal is to reach 100 library systems by year’s end. Libraries have always been a source of audiovisual entertainment. A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that among patrons 16 years old and older, 40 percent visited libraries to borrow movies. Another 16 percent borrowed music. In the Seattle area, DVDs and CDs of popular titles can have queues of hundreds of people waiting to check them out. E-books have been offered for years now. “Public libraries do not have the budgets to compete with Amazon, Comcast, and Netflix and will not be able to pay a premium for online content,” Blankenship said, adding that DVDs will continue to be the best way to offer popular movies. Updating and maintaining that physical collection takes time and money. It also means libraries have to pay for the media upfront, while Hoopla allows them to pay per time a title is borrowed. Those costs depend on the type of media and its release date, and range from 99 cents to $2.99.

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Now, Smule is connecting all its users and their content through a new Web-based system. The play screen for Smule’s Ocarina 2. (Credit: Smule) Every day, users of Smule’s Sing Karaoke sing 480,000 songs, and users of its Magic Piano play 1.2 million songs. And until now, all those songs have only been available to hear and interact with via the hit apps. But Smule wants the content its users generate to be available to everyone, not just those who have the apps, and today, the San Francisco startup launched a Web-based social network that it says is the largest social network of music makers in the world. Smule’s giant network of music makers and fans has been around for years. With Ocarina , Smule had one of the first major iPhone hit apps, a tool that let anyone create music using a digital tool meant to mimic a traditional wind instrument. Those songs could instantly be shared with a worldwide audience, and users could also simply listen to others playing with the app. Using apps like Ocarina, Ocarina 2 , or I am T-Pain, users have been able to create and share music with others around the world, regardless of whether they were friends or strangers. And through the apps, others have been able to listen to that music, and often, interact with it. With the new Web-based system, however, anyone with access to the Internet will be able to listen in, or interact, a system that Smule hopes will open up its network to a much larger audience, and ideally create much more music sharing and creation. Users will now be able to access the music — a terrabyte of which is added to Smule’s network every two days — via Facebook, Twitter, the company’s many apps, and the Web. It will also be easier for music fans to find the kind of songs they like, and make playlists based on creators whose work they enjoy. And Smule is hopeful that the Web platform will encourage more people to add layers to others’ songs, something that happens frequently on its system, with as many as 600 people contributing to a single piece of music. Originally posted at Tech Culture Topics: